‘#Offline’ Weekly Closes with a Bang

 

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Words by RKHTY

#Offline‘s weekly celebration of music bid farewell and played its final note in full style last night. Over the past nine months, the incomparable Q-Tip and 45 vinyl game changer Natasha Diggs have graced the patrons of Output with nostalgic gems after gems. And legends have guest starred at the night as well, including the likes of Grandmaster Flash, DJ Spinna, and Funk Master Flex, to name just a few.

From the booming sound system, to the varying spectrum of partygoers, you would never know it was a Wednesday night. And if you’ve ever been to #Offline before, you know you’ve always left feeling damn good. Wednesday never felt so good.

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NYC! Win Tickets to Ben Watt @ Rough Trade on April 2

 

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Veteran music maker, DJ, author, and label-owner Ben Watt is coming to NYC next week in celebration of his new album, Hendra. He’ll be playing Rough Trade in NYC on April 2, and The Echo in LA on April 4. You aren’t going to want to miss these!

Lucky NYCers have the chance to win tickets to the April 2 date!

Enter our contest to win tickets to watch Ben Watt live at Rough Trade on April 2

NYC Show
Wednesday, April 2

7:30PM

Tickets: $25
Purchase tickets

Rough Trade
Brooklyn, NY

LA Show
Friday, April 4

8:30PM

Tickets: $18-20
Purchase tickets

The Echo
Los Angeles, CA

NYC: Africa Now! Mainstage Concert @ Apollo Theater – April 5

 

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On April 5, join Africa Now! for a concert on the Apollo’s Mainstage. Performers include a griot trio from Senegal, a roots-reggae/Afrobeat collective from Sierra Leone, and a dynamo diva from Mali!

Event Details
Africa Now! Mainstage Concert
Saturday, April 5

8 PM

Tickets: $25, $35, $45
Purchase tickets

Apollo Theater
253 West 125th St
Harlem, NY 10027

NYC: Modeselektor @ Sankeys – April 24

 

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Bleep.com celebrates their 10th anniversary with a very special DJ appearance from Berlin electronic production duo Modeselektor on April 24 at Sankeys in NYC! Get to know why they’ve earned new genre classifications such as “bastard dancehall,” “happy metal,” and “psychedelic electro.” The duo will also be joined by guests FaltyDL, Aquarian, Turbo Tronix. Do not miss!

Event Details
Bleep10 presents Modeselektor + Special Guests
Thursday, April 24

10.30PM

Tickets: $20
Purchase tickets

Sankeys NYC
29 West 36th Street
New York, NY

‘NY Loves Dilla’ at Inaugural Event Hosted by Ma Dukes

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Words by Korby Benoit

Since my earliest experiences listening to acts like Run DMC, The Fat Boys and UTFO the sound of hip-hop always made sense to me.  No one had to explain it to me or tell me that this was the “cool” music to listen to. Hip-hop has provided my musical foundation and my entry into the world of the arts.

In the spring of 1996, I was a high school student attending the High School of Telecommunication Arts and Technology in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. By that time, I was a hip-hop geek who took great pride in his TDK and Maxell cassette collection of rap radio shows. I used to record Stretch Armstrong & Bobbito, The Underground Railroad with Jay Smooth, and DJ Evil Dee on Hot 97. Nevertheless, it was another Hot 97 show that introduced me to James Dewitt Yancey a.k.a. Jay Dee the artist later known as J Dilla. Future Flavors was the show and it was hosted by two of the genre’s most important and influential producers, Marley Marl and Pete Rock.

As I recall, at some point during their mix, Marley and Pete got on the mic to announce they were about to play a remix by Jay Dee. While I don’t remember if this was a remix for De La Soul, Busta Rhymes or Keith Murray, I do remember the level of excitement in the voices of the two hosts. I remember enjoying the song and like hip-hop itself, the sound just spoke to me. Yet this time in a way that was a little different; The sound was more melodic and the bass groove was simply groovier than anything I’d ever heard. At the time, it sounded like hip-hop from the future. Later I learned that Dilla was also responsible for Pharcyde’s “Runnin,” which was already one of my favorite songs in their catalog. It was evident that the producer had emerged with a new sound that rap luminaries and fans loved and longed for.

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