New Release: Boardwalk Empire Presents ‘Sounds of The Onyx’ + MP3

 

soto

HBO TV drama Boardwalk Empire presents Sounds of The Onyx, celebrating the launch of the popular show’s 4th season via remixes of “rare jazz recordings from the Prohibition Era.”

Remixers on the promo project include hip-hop elite Pete Rock, DJ Jazzy Jeff, Om’Mas Keith, Shafiq Husayn, JayCeeOh & B-Sides and Tall Black Guy.

The original recordings that set the foundation for this project come from legends like Eva Taylor & Clarence Williams’ Blue Five, Ethel Waters, Lloyd Scott & His Orchestra, Jim Jackson and Charlie Johnson’s Paradise Ten Orchestra.

The one exception is Pete Rock’s remix of a new recording from the official soundtrack: a cover version of “Sugarfoot Stomp” by Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks, also known as the Boardwalk Empire house band.

The Emmy Award winning series began its fourth season on September 8.

“Sugarfoot Stomp” by Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks (Pete Rock Remix) [MP3 via Facebook]

Facebook | Official Site

Video: DJ Jazzy Jeff & Ayah – “Forgive Me”

 

[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/Sdfyu9jLdk8" width="550" height="445" allowfullscreen="true" fvars="fs=1" /]

In July we saw the release of DJ Jazzy Jeff and Canadian vocalist Ayah’s Back For More, a free album of soulful goodness. Now catch the too real video for “Forgive Me,” an emotional plea about break ups to make ups and then back again. Take note of the sobering stats at the end of the video.

DJ Jazzy Jeff & Ayah – Back For More [Free Download on Bandcamp]

DJ Jazzy Jeff on Facebook | Twitter | Official Site

Ayah on Facebook | Twitter | Official Site

New Release: DJ Jazzy Jeff & Ayah – ‘Back For More’

 

Canadian soul vocalist Ayah has teamed up with DJ Jazzy Jeff to release yet another project, Back For More. They call it a mixtape, we say it listens like an album – it’s dope. Oh, and it’s free?! Yeah. Jazzy brings it with some new moods in his production, while Ayah reels you in with her infectious voice, costuming her instrument to do what she pleases. If you haven’t yet been treated to the talent that is Ayah, it’s about time you get to know what you’ve been missing. Stream and download for free below.

DJ Jazzy Jeff on Facebook | Twitter | Official Site

Ayah on Facebook | Twitter | Official Site

Giant Step’s Resident: The City, The Sounds, The Soul Part 6

Photo of Jazzy Jeff © Nick Digital

When I told my friend about my weekend, she flatly informed me with thinly-veiled horror that it was “bizarre.” I’m on the fence about the term. You, gentle reader, can be the judge. Let’s pretend the weekend started on Wednesday where I was eagerly awaiting a performance by Kid Cudi at Left Village bar Le Royale. The whole hourly-motel air makes my head hurt (where do establishments still get mirrored walls after 1978?). Anyway, I was excited to see Kid Cudi hit the stage because his MySpace page be poppin’ with his spacey brew of intergalactic hoodness. But live…wow. He rocked the crowd with all the vibrancy of a Saltine. His stage presence was desperate and inelegant. Overall, crappy. There was a lot of shouting out “peoples” that helped him through the struggle. Once again, desperate. The anti-climactic set wrapped up at midnight as the crowd unceremoniously filed out into the stinging cold.

The bizarreness really cropped up Thursday evening when I saw author and Rolling Stone contributing editor Anthony DeCurtis interview Mos Def at the 92nd Street Y. Mos ruminated on everything from his childhood (“too much basketball” nurtured his interest in acting) to his reservations about the good life (using the complimentary Bentley shuttle at a snooty hotel was a trifle much). He spoke with candid wit, dazzling the crowd with low-key astuteness and even previewing a freshly recorded track from his upcoming album, The Ecstatic. However, the question and answer period devolved into bedlam as the restless crowd began to claw at lofty echelons of inappropriateness. Shouts of “next question!!” rang out as an older woman told Mos his music had changed her son’s life. A fan behind me kept screeching “Mos!!” arbitrarily (or perhaps for the optimal annoyance factor) in my ear. Brassy women began loudly interrupting each other, vying recklessly for Mos’ attention. There was a bit of a “WTF” factor watching grown people ready to wrassle each other for some eye contact with Mos Def.

Friday night, I hit one of my favorite bizarro events, Flavorpill’s One Step Beyond jump-off featuring DJ Jazzy Jeff at the Natural History Museum (Rockin’ next to rock formations just never loses it’s heady “where-the-eff-am-I” appeal). This time, instead of the usual infestation of downtowners it was very grown n’ sexy: lots of wizened uptown cats and fly broads who bought “Summertime” on vinyl. The vibe was much more “family cookout” than “tight pants competition.” Jazzy played it safe but his comfort hits straddled a gang of genres. There was Crystal Waters’ never-say-die dance jam, “Gypsy Woman,” Mims’ mind-numbing ode to braggadocio, “This Is Why I’m Hot,” and Dee-Lite’s sunny heart-pumper, “Groove Is In The Heart.” The brazenly cool, Retro Kids made an appearance, bedecked in parachute pants, split-level fades and jocular dance moves that made the early ’90s the hotness. Between the Kids, Jazzy and the tunes, it was like 1992 came back for a quick spin around the planetarium. I was entertained.

The actual weekend was a furious blur of hookah smoke, karaoke, Sparks and disco as my posse and I decamped to this loopy loft party in the Brooklyn. One minute I was chatting up locals in a plastic spaceship, the next precariously creeping down an iron ladder in my pin-thin stilettos and later screeching on stage to an oddly captive audience with my boozy pals. When we finally stumbled out of the rabbit-hole into the pale dawn sunlight, we cabbed it to my friend’s Midtown hotel and ordered $17 fried chicken. However, I wasn’t licked yet and spent Sunday afternoon with my artist friend, Alexis Peskine in Hoboken, NJ (aka Stepford. I mean, is that place serious?) who asked me to pose for a painting. It was slightly disorienting to discuss the tension in the “subject’s” face when the image was my own surly mug.
Since I went this far without sleep I decided to keep the party going by hitting up the 718 Sessions with Danny Krivit. If anyone is deserving of a loyal groupiedom it is Krivit. He spun my brains into jelly with tons of extended mixes of plucky disco and early ’90s Euro-house. As I bounced to the beat, I felt like I was in the New York you see in movies. Lots of dark corners, never-ending vocal house and people having moments on the dance floor. This wasn’t a pageant where everyone is casing each other but a party where people swayed to the music with their eyes shut. Bizarre must be another word for “damn good time.”