NYC & DC: Hiatus Kaiyote Live – November 5 & 8

 

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Hot off their mystifying SummerStage performance a couple months back, we are proud to yet again present Melbourne’s internationally acclaimed Hiatus Kaiyote for two very special shows!

The two nights will take place on November 5 in NYC and November 8 in DC. In NYC, we’ll have opening sets by Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Emily King as well as the much loved DJ Rich Medina. In DC, the awesome DJ Thomas Blondet will be opening and setting the night off!

For those somehow still sleeping, the band fuses jazz, hip-hop, electronic, opera, rock and soul to concoct a truly disarming brand of future-soul like you’ve never heard. Hiatus Kaiyote released their debut album Tawk Tomahawk on July 30 via Sony Masterworks, and have received praise from highly-respected music industry staples like Questlove, Flying Lotus, Erykah Badu, Gilles Peterson, Stereogum, and KCRW. Legions of loyal fans and stans already abound – and with good reason!

NYC Details
Hiatus Kaiyote Live in NYC
with Emily King and DJ Rich Medina

Tuesday, November 5
Doors 7PM

Tickets: $25 adv / $30 door
Purchase tickets

Brooklyn Masonic Temple
317 Clermont Ave.
Brooklyn, NY

DC Details
Hiatus Kaiyote Live in DC
with DJ Thomas Blondet

Friday, November 8
Doors 7PM

Tickets: $20 (advance)
Purchase tickets

U Street Music Hall
1115 U Street NW
Washington DC

Throwback Thursday: Jamiroquai US Debut Show @ Supper Club – Nov 4, 1993

 

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For this week’s Throwback Thursday, Giant Step President/CEO Maurice Bernstein takes it back to Jamiroquai’s US debut! We know you’ve got some Jamiroquai memories – serve ‘em up!

This was Jamiroquai’s US debut. We first became familiar with them in the very early 90s when they released the “Too Young To Die” single on Acid Jazz. Very quickly, they were signed to a major deal on Sony in the UK. This was first artist we worked with from the “acid jazz” scene that really garnered major label interest. You had the Brand New Heavies before that, but this was huge – it was a massive, massive deal.

The album came out in the UK; it was a double album called Emergency On Planet Earth and it went straight to number one – #1 in Europe, #1 in Japan – massive. Keep in mind that before this all happened, the type of music we were all promoting was underground and not mainstream at all – but this was total mainstream.

With that said, it was then time for Jamiroquai to come to the US. Leading up to the show, the band came out to the states a few times to do bits of promo, and each time they’d come to the club and hang out with us; we got to get to know the guys pretty well.

Read the rest after the jump

Interview: Jose James Checks In Before SummerStage on August 11

 

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Before hitting SummerStage this Sunday, August 11, Jose James catches up with us about his relationship to Giant Step, his growth as an artist, and what’s up next.

Giant Step: How would you say Giant Step most influenced your music and/or career?

Jose James: Wow. It’s been so great, thank you guys. The first show was at the Hiro Ballroom in NYC opening for the amazing Alice Russell. Then we started the Brownswood Sessions at Nublu with DJ Moni and Taylor McFerrin. Beautiful times! Giant Step really paved the way for what I do, connecting hip-hop, soul, jazz and DJ culture. The London connection, Gilles Peterson, all that. It’s a global movement to present quality music.

GS: We’ve been with you from the start and it’s been a pleasure to see you progress; how would you say No Beginning No End Jose has evolved from The Dreamer Jose?

JJ: Well, I’m more well traveled. That influences you tremendously. When I made The Dreamer I was still in school and had only been to a couple places outside the US – now I’ve toured in 40 countries and counting. I’m actually in Mexico right now. You meet people and see how your music is loved worldwide and that’s a powerful thing. Now I have worldwide family and a great relationship with my fans. It’s beautiful. Musically I’m more comfortable expressing all the worlds I love – soul, R&B, jazz, rock, blues, gospel, hip-hop – and you can hear that on the new album, and in the collaborations – Robert Glasper, Pino Palladino, Emily King, Hindi Zahra.

GS: And where do you see yourself going next? Any challenges/goals you’re keen on tackling?

JJ: I’d like to reconnect with electronic music. I just dropped an EP on Blue Note with remixes by FaltyDL, Oddisee, fLako, and Taylor McFerrin. I lived in London for a year and went to Plastic People, Fabric, Cargo and met great DJs and producers like Benji B, Benga and Skream, Floating Points. So I miss that and want to do more in that world. I’m working on a new album now for next year called Desire.

Read the rest of the interview after the jump

Throwback Thursday: Incognito @ SOBs – May 19 & 20, 1993

 

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For this week’s Throwback Thursday, Giant Step President/CEO Maurice Bernstein shares his memories from Incognito’s US debut show in 1993. A throwback can’t be complete without our community, though; chime in at the comments and share your experiences from the night or just tell us about your favorite Incognito memory!

Incognito were a band that was part of the English funk movement of the 1980s alongside bands like Freez and Light of the World. By this time in 1993, Bluey, the leader of Incognito, had garnered a large following in the UK, Europe, and Japan.

In the early 90s the band was signed to Talking Loud, a label on Polygram that Gilles Peterson was then running. Their album at the time of this show was Tribes, Vibes, & Scribes and was released through Verve Forecast in the United States.

Washington DC based Maysa Leak was the vocalist and brought a very smooth R&B sound to Incognito. This sound really helped them gain quite a bit of popularity in the United States, seeing as it was very compatible with the adult urban format on the radio.

For this show, we brought the band out as part of a tour for their US debut. We did two sold out nights at SOBs with two shows a night. Incognito is a funky, tight band. As far as the crowd, you had your jazz-funkers, which is what I call myself, and then you had your adult urban crowd who were a bit older and knew Incognito from the radio. It was a nice mix of folks; some getting down and dancing, others mellowing out and taking in the music. It was just a great show, very fond memories.

And I have to say: Bluey was and still is one of the sweetest guys in the music business. He always stayed very pure and true to the music; Incognito is still going!