New Music from Foreign Exchange: “Maybe She’ll Dream Of Me” + MP3

The Foreign Exchange‘s new album Authenticity will be self-released October 12, and now we have a download: “Maybe She’ll Dream Of Me.” The track features piano by Zo! and the usual duo of Phonte and Nicolay. It sounds like this will be another leap forward for the group, after the 2010 Grammy nomination for “Daykeeper ft. Muhsinah” off the last album, Leave it All Behind.

The Foreign Exchange – “Maybe She’ll Dream of Me” [MP3]
 

+FE Music

Exile: Radio Bonus (Free Album Download)

In preparation for his upcoming AM/FM (The Radio Remixes Album), Exile is offering the Radio Bonus album for free download. It’s full of remixes of original Radio tracks that just couldn’t all fit on AM/FM, from producers like DJ Rhettmatic, Marco Polo, DaVinci, Mike Gao, and more.

AM/FM is dropping August 31 via Plug Research and will feature Blu, Fashawn, Aloe Blacc, Shafiq Husayn, Free The Robots, DJ Day, Alchemist, and Muhsinah to name a few. Find out more on Exile’s new official site, thedirtyscience.com.

And check out one of our favorites from Exile’s debut LP, Radio:

Muhsinah to Record First Studio Album, Dear _______

Since we didn’t post this awesome video when it came out a few months back, we’re posting it now in light of Muhsinah’s album fundraising efforts through the trendy new platform Kickstarter. If the project reaches it’s goal of $31K by July 4, Muhsinah will record her first studio album, Dear _____. This Grammy nominated artist is on Thom Yorke’s (Radiohead) current top 10 list, has toured with Common as part of the Universal Mind Control stage show, and has been featured in a plethora of indie releases since her graduation from the Red Bull Music Academy. Find out more about the project or pledge to donate here.


Giant Step’s Resident: The City, The Sounds, The Soul Part 17

Photo of James Pants

By Mawuse Ziegbe

Recently, I’ve discovered two bands who’ve made me want to slap my mama…out of joy of course. There’s lots of buzz about shiny new bands brimming with spunk and glamour. But for The Kills and The Whitest Boy Alive, dizzying laptop-critic buzz is old hat. I absentmindedly downloaded “Cheap and Cheerful” after hearing journos in the American Apparel media (Nylon, Fader, Pitchfork etc) yapping about the platonic punk pair Alison “VV” Mosshart and Jamie “Hotel” Hince. Can we talk about the rowdy that song is? The pouty vocals, the snappy lyrics and snarly guitars, all kicked off by a phlegm cough from “VV.” Their latest, Midnight Boom, is twinkly lo-fi – moody and spare with moments of spry wit and petulant kick. I thought I was all on the pulse only to learn this is their third album. Drat.

And when I stumbled onto The Whitest Boy Alive I was straight-up sore that no one invited me to the party earlier. The Whitest Boy Alive is actually several (four) white boys (German to be exact) who pump out plucky electro rock. Think the bastard child of Peter Bjorn and John and The Rapture. Sorta like beach music for the city. Sunny jams like “Figures” and “Burning” make their 2006 album, Dreams enjoyable. But the shadowy laments of heartbreak and smoky soul on tracks like “Golden Cage” and “Done With You” make it memorable.

I wish someone had hipped me to The Kills and The Whitest Boy Alive earlier but with the glut of music the average listener is faced with, things slip through the cracks. Here are some newbies whose hype you should believe wholeheartedly. Listen hard when their publicity machine comes grinding in your direction.

Janelle Monae
You may have first seen her in the sunny clip for Outkast’s “Morris Brown.” Diddy got wind of her fabulousness and now she’s on a joint deal between Bad Boy and Big Boi’s Purple Ribbon labels. Tiny and uncontained, the ex-drama kid brings a genuine sense of theater to her performances. Her peppy sound bounces between breezy, plush lounge and something that sounds like punk rock for fairytales. No tired torch songs here just cryptic yet poetic lyrics about aliens and androids – you know, girl stuff. And can we talk about how homegirl keeps a reserve of spankin’ fresh saddle shoes? That alone is worth a marriage proposal.

You should check out: “Violent Stars / Happy Hunting”

http://www.myspace.com/janellemonae

Black Kids
Let’s not pretend that name isn’t a head turner. It smacks of gimmicky desperation. But praise MySpace their skills extend beyond a flair for catchy name-selection. The five members of Black Kids (only two are actually black) hail from Jacksonsville, FL. That may account for the balmy guitar that cloaks the tracks on their 2007 EP, Wizards of Ahhs. Their appeal lies in their irreverent teenaged cool (“it’s Friday night and I ain’t got nobody so what’s the use of a making a bed?”). Only bad thing is that they’re currently soooooo cool that they’ve got a hit song in the UK (“I’m Not Gonna Teach Your Boyfriend How To Dance With You”) and they’re touring all over Europe with nary a stateside date on their MySpace. Boo.

Check out: “Hurricane Jane” www.blackkidsrock.com

Muhsinah
So Muhsinah is a name that has been peppering my favorite media outlets like nobody’s business (check out the power-fawning over at Okayplayer.com). At first listen her appeal is very basic: lots of dreamy soul with liberal use of horns, flutes and dusky percussion. But the DC native mixes it up on her album Day.Break. Bless her for weaving together sensual Bossa Nova with steely beats on “Only and Always.” The project is entirely self-produced, shaming a lot of the children cluttering the Hot 100. Her knob-twiddling style is reminiscent of both Nicolay and J. Dilla and her vocals can be disjointed yet comforting. She’s a bit subtle for the meatheads but that’s always a good sign.

Check out: “Only and Always” www.muhsinah.com

James Pants
James Pants is pretty much my favorite producer, music-maker and funny-picture-taker right now. He churns out splashy noise that at first sounds like a racket but when the melody settles in…ooh chile. Pants is a chubby-cheeked producer-singer based in Washington who clawed his way up from intern to artist at Stones Throw and homeboy has got some soul. His sound is flossy disco topped with a healthy dollop of shimmery tambourine-laced sound effects. Imagine if Gary Wilson wrote and produced for the Bee Gees. His money-hungry single “Kash” came out last year and since then he’s dipped his funky little toe in everything from rowdy garage rock to moody new wave. At this rate, next year he could be doling out hip hop polkas with finesse. And I need to hear that.

Check out: “We’re Through” www.myspace.com/jamespants

Giant Step’s Resident: The City, The Sounds, The Soul Part 16

Photo of Muhsinah and Don Will of Tanya Morgan © Dorothy Hong

By Muwase Ziegbe

Hey lovers. Last week was all about the up-and-comers; the young’ns scrapping to the top of the heap with a song in their heart and a MySpace login. Tuesday night I hit up the issue release party for Theme magazine at 70 Greene Street (I love how “random recreation space” is the new “hot downtown spot”) featuring Eric Lau, Kissey Asplund and Muhsinah. Theme has its artful little eye on the deal-makers and rule-breakers making inroads in Asian culture and beyond. So having Eric Lau bring his Britain-based beatmaking skills to SoHo was definitely a good look. Lau flashed his head-nodding finesse on the wheels of steel, dishing out comfort soul from J. Dilla’s blissed-out take on “Think Twice” to D’Angelo’s guttural “Spanish Joint.” After swigging a few glasses of Black Swan Merlot, Kissey Asplund’s splintery, screechy vocals and absent-minded stage presence were disorienting. And Muhsinah is an able beatmaker and I was wicked excited for her performance but her gentle sound failed to connect with the audience. But impromptu performances from hip hop collective Tanya Morgan and rapper Eagle Nebula kicked up the energy a bit.

Afterwards, I upped the soul quotient at Be Easy, a Tuesday night jump-off at Tillman’s in Chelsea. Tillman’s is adorable with a nostalgic décor that reminds me of my rich auntie’s living room; the one who doesn’t want my grubby paws on her mid-century upholstery. But their recession-resistant prices definitely make me feel like an unloved stepchild. And as any night at the T, the people are like, totally beautiful; an after work spot for people whose jobs are obscenely cool – writers, artists, music heads etc. The playlist is powered by a rotating cluster of homies who take turns spinning and keeping the good vibes going. The music ranges from Little Brother to the Brothers Johnson to all the dusky hip hop soul in between. And host even hipped me to T.K. Wonder, a singer who makes buttery electro stuff and happens to slang dranks there. Even the wait staff is cooler than you.

Wednesday night I met the face of excess as Stoli and Wired magazine hosted a night of live digital art and dranky dranks at Hotel Stoli. The “hotel” was really just an expansive warehouse on the Hudson which Stoli tricked out with Ikea-esque rooms representing different flavors like Orange and Razberi. Conceptually the night was a winner: check out some artsy nerdlingers, like graphic artist Jelson Jargon, tinker and create digital art while you take your blood alcohol levels to new and exciting heights. And it was cool to see artists working in 10-minute intervals building upon each others’ work and birthing funky stuff like a radio tower inserted into a retooled photo of a soldier in combat. My only beef was that in such a huge space, there should have been more gargantuan screens on which to watch the magic unfold.

Thursday I saw your soon to be favorite singer, Janelle Monae. In the past month, I’ve seen everyone from Jay-Z to Erykah Badu and she handily threw down the best performance I’ve seen in a long time. She’s small and spry and kicked around the Highline Ballroom stage with trippy dance moves and spacey grooves. Imagine if a paranormal being landed in Roswell in 1957 and instead of seeking mind control over the masses, it just wanted to jam! Add a floppy pompadour and you’ve got Janelle Monae. Thoroughly satisfying.

Saturday night, I stayed up late to check out Korrupt, a party in a Chinatown food court hosted by Bijules and The Retro Kids (I actually missed the Retro Kids’ performance but one of them tried to get in my cab while I was still in it. I feel closer to God). Mussy-haired lost boys in too much day-glo infested the cutesy Chinese banquet room where I caught DJ Wools and DJ XXXChange packing the dance floor. The music was absolutely excellent with everything from choppy B-more club remixes of Curtis Mayfield to the Stardust’s Saturday night staple, “The Music Sounds Better With You.” Neo-disco begats debauchery so I was happy.

So what have we learned this week, boys and girls? The parties of tomorrow will be held in nameless rooms, footed by flossy likka companies where you’ll see MySpace singers before they become MySpace-sponsored singers. And you may feel closer to God.