‘NY Loves Dilla’ at Inaugural Event Hosted by Ma Dukes

dilla

Words by Korby Benoit

Since my earliest experiences listening to acts like Run DMC, The Fat Boys and UTFO the sound of hip-hop always made sense to me.  No one had to explain it to me or tell me that this was the “cool” music to listen to. Hip-hop has provided my musical foundation and my entry into the world of the arts.

In the spring of 1996, I was a high school student attending the High School of Telecommunication Arts and Technology in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. By that time, I was a hip-hop geek who took great pride in his TDK and Maxell cassette collection of rap radio shows. I used to record Stretch Armstrong & Bobbito, The Underground Railroad with Jay Smooth, and DJ Evil Dee on Hot 97. Nevertheless, it was another Hot 97 show that introduced me to James Dewitt Yancey a.k.a. Jay Dee the artist later known as J Dilla. Future Flavors was the show and it was hosted by two of the genre’s most important and influential producers, Marley Marl and Pete Rock.

As I recall, at some point during their mix, Marley and Pete got on the mic to announce they were about to play a remix by Jay Dee. While I don’t remember if this was a remix for De La Soul, Busta Rhymes or Keith Murray, I do remember the level of excitement in the voices of the two hosts. I remember enjoying the song and like hip-hop itself, the sound just spoke to me. Yet this time in a way that was a little different; The sound was more melodic and the bass groove was simply groovier than anything I’d ever heard. At the time, it sounded like hip-hop from the future. Later I learned that Dilla was also responsible for Pharcyde’s “Runnin,” which was already one of my favorite songs in their catalog. It was evident that the producer had emerged with a new sound that rap luminaries and fans loved and longed for.

Read the rest after the jump

New Release: Boardwalk Empire Presents ‘Sounds of The Onyx’ + MP3

 

soto

HBO TV drama Boardwalk Empire presents Sounds of The Onyx, celebrating the launch of the popular show’s 4th season via remixes of “rare jazz recordings from the Prohibition Era.”

Remixers on the promo project include hip-hop elite Pete Rock, DJ Jazzy Jeff, Om’Mas Keith, Shafiq Husayn, JayCeeOh & B-Sides and Tall Black Guy.

The original recordings that set the foundation for this project come from legends like Eva Taylor & Clarence Williams’ Blue Five, Ethel Waters, Lloyd Scott & His Orchestra, Jim Jackson and Charlie Johnson’s Paradise Ten Orchestra.

The one exception is Pete Rock’s remix of a new recording from the official soundtrack: a cover version of “Sugarfoot Stomp” by Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks, also known as the Boardwalk Empire house band.

The Emmy Award winning series began its fourth season on September 8.

“Sugarfoot Stomp” by Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks (Pete Rock Remix) [MP3 via Facebook]

Facebook | Official Site

New Track: Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks “Sugarfoot Stomp” (Pete Rock Remix)

 

Onyx_MJSWNOSPINE_f_1_550

HBO’s Boardwalk Empire returns for its fourth season this coming Sunday, and Giant Step has partnered with HBO, ABKCO Records and Sony Music Entertainment for a special music project entitled Sounds of The Onyx that features rare jazz recordings from the Prohibition Era remixed by some of the best contemporary urban music producers. Vibe kicked things off today with the release of Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks’ “Sugarfoot Stomp” remixed by Pete Rock. It is available for free download via facebook.com/abkco. The entire project will be available for stream only on September 16th. Check out the full tracklisting below.

While the other remixes utilize vintage 1920’s recordings, Pete Rock was the only collaborator tasked to remix one of the new recordings from the official soundtrack: a cover version of the classic composition performed by Giordano and the NYC jazz ensemble, who serve as the Boardwalk Empire house band.

Volume 2 of the show’s official soundtrack is available now and features all new recordings from a wide range of vocalists – from Elvis Costello and Patti Smith to St. Vincent and The National’s Matt Berninger – singing timeless standards and forgotten gems from the 1920s. Download it now on iTunes.

Sounds of The Onyx
1. Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks “Sugarfoot Stomp” (Pete Rock Remix)
2. Eva Taylor & Clarence Williams’ Blue Five “Red Hot Flo From Kokomo (Jazz Vampires)” (DJ Jazzy Jeff Remix)
3. Ethel Waters “One Sweet Letter From You” (Om’Mas Keith Remix)
4. Lloyd Scott & His Orchestra “ Happy Hour Blues” (Shafiq Husayn Remix)
5. Jim Jackson “Bootlegging Blues” (JayCeeOh & B-Sides Remix)
6. Charlie Johnson’s Paradise Ten Orchestra “You Ain’t The One” (Tall Black Guy Remix)

Rest In Peace, George Duke

 

8007008P03R0

Legendary keyboardist George Duke has passed at the age of 67. Left behind are over 30 solo albums and credit for creating bridges between Brazilian music, funk, R&B, and jazz. His work crossed several decades and included collaborations with Miles Davis, Anita Baker, Frank Zappa, Smokey Robinson, Gladys Knight, and George Clinton – some of the very best

His work carried over the generations and has been sampled by Daft Punk, Common, Kanye West, MF Doom, Madlib, Pete Rock, Ice Cube, and A Tribe Called Quest.

In July of this year, Duke released a new album called DreamWeaver in memory of his wife who passed just over a year ago.

Duke and his ongoing contributions to music will be sorely missed.

Below, watch Duke perform one of our favorite tracks, “Dukey Stick,” with Sheila E in studio. After the jump, find rare footage of a full live show at the Montreux Jazz Festival with Billy Cobham.

Montreux Jazz Festival performance after the jump